Celebrate Two Huge Historic Moments that Took Place in Watertown

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Charlie Breitrose

Bob Childs of the Historical Society of Watertown reads the Declaration of Independence from the same spot it was first read in 1776, the second floor of the Edmund Fowle House.

Charlie Breitrose

Bob Childs of the Historical Society of Watertown reads the Declaration of Independence from the same spot it was first read in 1776, the second floor of the Edmund Fowle House during a previous Treaty Day celebration.

The Historical Society of Watertown will celebrate two significant historical events for the town, the state and the nation during the Treaty Day celebration.

The Historical Society announced that everyone is welcome at the free event on Saturday July 15, 2017, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at the Edmund Fowle House, 28 Marshall St., Watertown.

The Treaty Day 2017 event marks two important occasions in history that occurred at the Edmund Fowle House in Watertown: the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence to the citizens of Watertown on July 18, 1776; the signing of the first treaty negotiated by the new nation with a foreign power, namely the St. John’s (a.k.a. Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Tribes of Nova Scotia on July 19, 1776.

Guest speakers will share information related to the importance of the Treaty. Nugumij (Grandmother) Drum from the United Native American Cultural Center will be present. Drummers/Singers will perform several songs to mark the occasion. Members, dressed in their Native regalia and colonial re-eanactors will be present to share their stories. Tours of the Edmund Fowle House will be available.

A donation basket for non perishable food will be available for the Watertown Food Pantry. The event is partially funded by the Watertown Community Foundation.

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